Archive for April 19, 2009

You Can Throw Away the Scale and the Tape Measure

Junkfood Science brings you the numbers and studies proving that obese individuals do not have elevated health risks; in fact, the healthiest weight seems to be heavier than that currently recommended.

You shouldn’t be surprised. There isn’t a lot of money to be made telling people that they are perfectly healthy; HOWEVER, there are big bucks to be made selling supplements, exercise equipment, diet books, gym memberships, etc.


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What the Tea Parties Are All About

Apparently reporters just don’t get it. Neither do our elected “representatives” who are not representing our wishes. Here’s an explanation from Karl Denninger of The Market Ticker.

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Coming Soon to Your Community?

From Yahoo News:

Some of the men showed signs of torture: Burns seared into their earlobes revealed where modified jumper cables had been clamped as an improvised electrocution device. Adhesive from duct tape used to bind the victims still clung to wrists and faces, from mouths to noses.

As a final touch, throats were slashed open, post-mortem.

It didn’t take long for Curry and federal agents to piece together clues: A murder scene, clean save for the crimson-turned-brown stains now spotting the carpet. Just a couple of mattresses tossed on the floor. It was a typical stash house.

But the cut throats? Some sort of ghastly warning.

Curry would soon find this was a retaliation hit over drug money with ties to Mexico’s notorious Gulf Cartel.

Curry also found out firsthand what federal drug enforcement agents have long understood. The drug war, with the savagery it brings, knows no bounds. It had landed in his back yard, in the foothills of the Appalachians, in Alabama’s wealthiest county, around the corner from The Home Depot.

One thousand, twenty-four miles from the Mexico border.

Another opportunity for Obama to spring forth and show leadership instead of his terrorist ass-kissing world tour!

Awww, come on. You don’t think he’ll actually crack down on illegal immigration, do you? Beef up border security? Build a barrier? Call for enforcement of immigration laws?

Don’t feel smug because it didn’t happen in your region. It is happening in your region, my region, everybody’s region.

And now the cartels have brought the fight to us: In 230 U.S. cities, the Mexican organizations maintain distribution hubs or supply drugs to local distributors, according to the Justice Department’s National Drug Intelligence Center.

Places like Miami and other longtime transportation points along the California, Arizona and Texas borders. But also Twin Falls, Idaho. Billings, Mont. Wichita, Kan. Phoenix. St. Louis. Milwaukee.

Even Shelby County.

The quintuple homicide occurred just outside the Birmingham city limits and a half-hour’s drive north of Columbiana, the county seat.

“We became a hub without knowing it,” Sheriff Curry says. “We’ve got to wake people up because we’re seeing it all over the place. It is now firmly located throughout this country.”

The talk of the day is “spillover” violence — at once the stuff of sensationalism but also a very real concept.

In Phoenix, the nation’s fifth-largest city, police report close to 1,000 kidnappings over the past three years tied to border smuggling, be it human or drugs or both. The rise parallels a shift in illegal immigrant crossings from California and Texas to the Arizona border, where many of the same gangs transporting people transport drugs. The perpetrators are often after ransom money, for a drug load lost or from a family that paid to have a relative brought over.

The problem has earned the city the unfortunate distinction of “America’s kidnapping capital” in some media accounts, even though the incidents are mostly out of sight and out of mind for law-abiding residents and overall crime, including homicides, was down last year.

In Atlanta, which has grown into a major distribution hub for the Gulf Cartel, trafficker-on-trafficker violence has become more common as the cartels, in the face of Calderon’s crackdown, impose tighter payment schedules and grow less tolerant of extending credit, says Rodney Benson, chief of the Drug Enforcement Administration there.

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