3 More H1N1 Deaths in Jacksonville This Week

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — In the past week, a 25-year-old man and two women in their 50s died in Jacksonville with confirmed cases of the H1N1 flu.

The Duval County Health Department said there have now been 11 deaths in the county as a result of the flu. The state of Florida reports 102 laboratory-confirmed H1N1 deaths.

Health officials say that while most cases of the so-called swine flu are mild, there are exceptions. Pre-existing health conditions often play a role in how individuals react to the flu.

“H1N1 swine flu, like seasonal flu, can in some circumstances be very serious, therefore, all of us should continue to adhere to good health practices including, stay home if sick, cover cough and sneeze, and wash hands frequently,” said Florida’s surgeon general, Ana Viamonte Ros.

People with respiratory illness should stay home from work or school to avoid spreading infections, including influenza, to others in the community.

Yeah, that “washing hands frequently” thing doesn’t work so well if there isn’t a sink in the classroom. If everybody with a respiratory infection stayed home, there wouldn’t be any students as well as any teachers at school.

Also read Jacksonville.com’s article on 3 swine flu deaths in 3 days last week.

Health officials confirmed the deaths today of three Duval County residents who died of swine flu over the span of three days last week.

The deaths raise the swine flu death toll in Duval to 11, which makes the county second in Florida to Miami-Dade County’s 22.

Dead are a 25-year-old man and a 56-year-old woman who each died last Saturday and a 55-year-old woman who died Thursday. Authorities did not say whether the cases involved existing health problems — one of swine flu’s high-risk groups.

Across Northeast Florida, 13 have died. Clay and St. Johns counties have reported one death apiece.

Across Florida, health officials today reported 11 swine flu deaths newly confirmed over the past week and 102 overall since the virus first appeared last April.

Sure am glad it isn’t flu season!

CDC Says Get Your Pneumonia Shot!

From Tampa Bay Online:

Valerie Post, 24, who died Monday after the health department count was taken, died Monday night.

“A mom who had just delivered just died, and she seemed to be healthy other than pregnancy, so it’s a serious disease and one we should really pay attention to,” said Maggie Hall, spokeswoman for the Pinellas County Health Department.

Health officials say Post had no underlying health conditions but pregnant women are in the high-risk group for swine flu.

In the last two weeks, swine flu claimed the life of two other people in the Bay Area, both in good health – a 39-year old Pinellas County man and a 14-year-old from Highlands County

Army: FL recruit death in SC is swine-flu related
By SUSANNE M. SCHAFER (AP) – 2 hours ago

COLUMBIA, S.C. — The Army says an autopsy shows a soldier from Florida who died while at Fort Jackson in South Carolina passed away from pneumonia caused by the H1N1 flu virus.

Fort Jackson officials said Thursday the death of 23-year-old Spc. Christopher Hogg of Deltona, Fla., is the first such death at the Army’s largest basic training site.

Pentagon officials say they’re trying to confirm details of the case.

Hogg died a week after he was taken to a the hospital with fever and respiratory problems. He was in his fifth week of basic training and would have graduated Oct. 15.

9 Responses so far »

  1. 1

    Unfortunately, what is little understood by the general public is that the only reason people die from the flu is that they have either an immune suppressing chronic illness, such as diabetes, direct immune dysfunction, dietary deficiencies of critical immune-supporting nutrients, chronic pulmonary disease, heart disease or cancer. Flu shots = money, not safety. What we’re not being told can hurt us and our children! -Dr. Jake

  2. 2

    kc said,

    So, I wonder if PGU has gotten a flu shot…and it sounds like My Chief doesn’t NEED one, even though he works with people who generally have compromised systems (LOTS of dialysis patients, for example). I’d like him to wear a mask, but you already know the flack I took for mentioning it.

  3. 3

    H1N1 flu is transmitted mostly by physical contact rather than by being exposed to coughing by infected individuals. You can use a hand sanitizer and clean commonly used surfaces, such as computer keyboards, telephone speakers, countertops and door handles with sanitizer cloths. Masks are not so critical with this strain as it is not airborne.

    I think the most important quote from from the Jacksonville article cited in the blog above is:
    “Health officials say that while most cases of the so-called swine flu are mild, there are exceptions. Pre-existing health conditions often play a role in how individuals react to the flu.”

    The dangers of vaccinations to us or our childrens long term health prospects and longevity far outweigh any potential benefits touted by the pharmaceutical industry for vaccines. Vaccines often don’t work plus they have very dangerous side-effects. I would at least think twice before getting one: http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2009/09/26/Flu-Vaccine-Exposed.aspx

    I personally do not plan to take the vaccine myself as nobody can promise me that it’s safe.  Additionally, none of the patient inserts from the vaccine manufacturers even claim the vaccine will prevent you from the H1N1 Swine Flu. Think about it, vaccination is a medical intervention performed on a healthy person that has the ability to result in injury or death of that person.  I do not want any medicine that could kill me, especially when I’m not sick.  How does that make any sense?  The flu at least I know is relatively safe and won’t permanently damage me.

    Don’t believe the hype! http://wp.me/pC1DX-2J

    -Dr. Jake

  4. 4

    swampie said,

    Yep. In the meantime, 5 more kids up at the nurse’s office today….3 for elevated temperatures (above 103) and 2 with lower temperatures but vomiting everywhere, poor things.

  5. 5

    An interesting note on childhood mortality and swine flu: CDC data indicate that Vitamin D deficient children at higher risk of death of swine flu. Additionally, almost two-thirds of the dead children had epilepsy, cerebral palsy, or other neurodevelopmental conditions like mental retardation. All of these neurological conditions are associated with childhood Vitamin D deficiency. Exacerbating the problem further, many of these kids take anticonvulsant drugs, which lower Vitamin D levels. -Dr. Jake

  6. 6

    swampie said,

    Connective tissue, stop spreading disinformation. Flu is a respiratory illness that is spread through airborne viral secretions (i.e., coughing). Vaccines have been and continue to be a huge lifesaver. How did smallpox get eradicated? Vaccination. Why don’t we have huge polio epidemics anymore? Vaccination. Why aren’t there lots of malformed babies from maternal German Measles aka rubella? D’oh! I think I know the answer to that one, too.

    ANYBODY that thinks that vaccines are more dangerous than the diseases they prevent is an idiot.

    • 7

      In terms of comparing polio/small pox vaccines to flu vaccines, we’re comparing apples and oranges. In terms of vaccination, the smaller the genome of the virus, the more effective the vaccines.

      Flu viruses have much larger amount of genetic material and hence the vaccines are much less effective. Small pox virus on the other hand has one of the smallest amounts of genetic material of any virus, so the vaccine is more effective, though certainly not risk free. Polio virus does not have a large amount of genetic material either.

      Do flu shots really work? Here’s some evidence to ponder:

      Not in babies: In a review of more than 51 studies involving more than 294,000 children it was found there was “no evidence that injecting children 6-24 months of age with a flu shot was any more effective than placebo. In children over 2 yrs, it was only effective 33% of the time in preventing the flu. Reference: Vaccines for preventing influenza in healthy children.” The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. 2 (2008).

      Not in children with asthma: A study 800 children with asthma, where one half were vaccinated and the other half did not receive the influenza vaccine. The two groups were compared with respect to clinic visits, emergency department (ED) visits, and hospitalizations for asthma. CONCLUSION: This study failed to provide evidence that the influenza vaccine prevents pediatric asthma exacerbations. Reference: “Effectiveness of influenza vaccine for the prevention of asthma exacerbations.” Christly, C. et al. Arch Dis Child. 2004 Aug;89(8):734-5.

      Not in children with asthma (2): “The inactivated flu vaccine, Flumist, does not prevent influenza-related hospitalizations in children, especially the ones with asthma…In fact, children who get the flu vaccine are more at risk for hospitalization than children who do not get the vaccine.” Reference: The American Thoracic Society’s 105th International Conference, May 15-20, 2009, San Diego.

      Not in adults: In a review of 48 reports including more than 66,000 adults, “Vaccination of healthy adults only reduced risk of influenza by 6% and reduced the number of missed work days by less than one day (0.16) days. It did not change the number of people needing to go to hospital or take time off work.” Reference: “Vaccines for preventing influenza in healthy adults.” The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. 1(2006).

      Not in the Elderly: In a review of 64 studies in 98 flu seasons, for elderly living in nursing homes, flu shots were non-significant for preventing the flu. For elderly living in the community, vaccines were not (significantly) effective against influenza, ILI or pneumonia. Reference: “Vaccines for preventing influenza in the elderly.” The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. 3(2006).

  7. 8

    Do flu shots work?

    Not in babies: In a review of more than 51 studies involving more than 294,000 children it was found there was “no evidence that injecting children 6-24 months of age with a flu shot was any more effective than placebo. In children over 2 yrs, it was only effective 33% of the time in preventing the flu. Reference: Vaccines for preventing influenza in healthy children.” The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. 2 (2008).

    Not in children with asthma: A study 800 children with asthma, where one half were vaccinated and the other half did not receive the influenza vaccine. The two groups were compared with respect to clinic visits, emergency department (ED) visits, and hospitalizations for asthma. CONCLUSION: This study failed to provide evidence that the influenza vaccine prevents pediatric asthma exacerbations. Reference: “Effectiveness of influenza vaccine for the prevention of asthma exacerbations.” Christly, C. et al. Arch Dis Child. 2004 Aug;89(8):734-5.

    Not in children with asthma (2): “The inactivated flu vaccine, Flumist, does not prevent influenza-related hospitalizations in children, especially the ones with asthma…In fact, children who get the flu vaccine are more at risk for hospitalization than children who do not get the vaccine.” Reference: The American Thoracic Society’s 105th International Conference, May 15-20, 2009, San Diego.

    Not in adults: In a review of 48 reports including more than 66,000 adults, “Vaccination of healthy adults only reduced risk of influenza by 6% and reduced the number of missed work days by less than one day (0.16) days. It did not change the number of people needing to go to hospital or take time off work.” Reference: “Vaccines for preventing influenza in healthy adults.” The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. 1(2006).

    Not in the Elderly: In a review of 64 studies in 98 flu seasons, for elderly living in nursing homes, flu shots were non-significant for preventing the flu. For elderly living in the community, vaccines were not (significantly) effective against influenza, ILI or pneumonia. Reference: “Vaccines for preventing influenza in the elderly.” The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. 3(2006).

  8. 9

    swampie said,

    You had best cite the actual medical journal where those studies took place. European Respiratory Journal, 5/30/07:

    The around 50% reduced overall mortality previously associated with influenza vaccination among the elderly is based on studies neither fully taking into account systematic differences between individuals who accept or decline vaccination, nor encompassing the entire general population. We performed a population based prospective cohort study in Stockholm County, Sweden, including all persons 65 years, or older, (n260.000) during three influenza seasons 1998/99, 1999/00, and 2000/01. Relative risks for mortality among vaccinated versus unvaccinated were estimated using Cox’ proportional hazards regression, adjusted for, and stratified by, demographic factors and co-morbidity during and off, respectively, each of the three seasons.

    Influenza vaccination was associated with an un-adjusted reduction in all-cause mortality by 50%, 46%, and 42%, respectively, which decreased to 14% (95% CI 5-23%), 19% (95% CI 11-27%), and 1% (95% CI -10-11%), following adjustment for confounders and differences in mortality between vaccinated and unvaccinated after the influenza season. The NNTs to prevent one death were 297 (212-495), 158 (123-222), and 743 (314-).

    Influenza vaccination remains a very effective intervention, since only 150 to 300 elderly needed be vaccinated to prevent one death, although the effectiveness in reducing all-cause mortality in elderly persons is lower than previously thought.


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